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Worn as a "badge of honor", here is an early review from 1987 in The New York Times on Floating Falling for cello & timpani which premiered at Merkin Concert Hall. The music's rhythmic drive and minimal approach was a stark contrast to the other pieces on the program eliciting this response:

"...a trial - its repetitious style and scarcely varied timbres wearing out their welcome about halfway through this relatively brief piece."

-The New York Times

…textually shimmering and harmonically ravishing …like a flower blooming before your eyes.

-Gramophone

…the next developments in the sphere (of) minimalism...state-of-the-art examples of this style world.

-All Music

This is one of the most fun albums to come my way in a while. ...this heavily minimalist-tinged music offers constant delight …impeccably crafted and played by all concerned with pinpoint accuracy.

-Fanfare

…everything flows in linear and circular motion as though a beautifully eccentric segmented ballet simultaneously restrained and exuberant, more than once ecstatic. …the entire concept of music top to bottom marvelously persists in non-stop hybridzation and transmogrification.

-Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange

…a beautiful and texturally fascinating sonic landscape which fully encompasses the listener in its sinuous melodies and jazz-infused rhythms", "…the album stands as a timeless combination of contemporary classical music, minimalism, and jazz into a profound and dynamic multidisciplinary work.

-Second Inversion

A flawless gem... superlative film scores of rare beauty and consummate aesthetic discretion.

- Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange

Susman's Duo Montuño for piano and clarinet... transparent... 'floating' Impressionist chords ...quietly powerful...

-Culture Vulture

...an atmosphere that amplifies the wonder, beauty and melancholy of the film's story [Fate of the Lhapa] and imagery. .. richly varied in orchestration and mood.

-All Music Guide

William Susman's Uprising (1988)...evokes the implacable horrors of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising...a powerful evocation of planes of sound...and an acute sensitivity to color, which Holzman projected superbly.

- Michael McDonagh, Classical Music Review

...the score [Oil on Ice] reveals considerable sophistication in its composition. ...the sound quality is immaculate -- full and vivid.

-All Music Guide

In his evocative and sometimes programmatic Uprising, William Susman bears witness to the Warsaw Ghetto uprising... [pianist David Holzman] proved a passionate advocate...a Horowitz of modern music.

- Jerry Kuderna, San Francisco Classical Voice.

Angels of Light ...inspired by a Mark Helprin novel... transparent... timeless... exquisite tonal clashes.

-Michael McDonagh, 21st Century Music

...from the Ellington-Strayhorn Songbook... moody, majestic... with smooth, seductive playing... Ellington's 1937 Caravan... which displayed Susman's steady, heavy left hand vamp, ... an entranced audience... applauded vociferously.

-Michael McDonagh, Classical Music Review

Angels of Light ...oscillating ...shimmers with refracted light. ...vivacious colors.

-Scott MacClelland, MetroActive

…a charged, colorful fabric. The ensemble conducted by Germani played (Twisted Figures) beautifully… Fast and furious, …an exciting penultimate panoply.

-Kenneth Young, The Buffalo News

Twisted Figures, a virtuoso chamber work… Full of flash and fury that belies its technically controlled compositional agenda… played with a fine hectic passion…

-Kenneth Young, The Buffalo News

...[The Harrington String Quartet] gave a vivid impression of the turbulent, watery imagery of William Susman's Streams, a swirling, rich-textured microtonal work.

- Allan Kozinn, The New York Times

William Susman's Six Minutes and Thirty Seconds... sparkling... an essay of spirit and grace...sinuous lines in the French horn and bassoon...

- Mark Alburger, 20th-Century Music

Susman's The Starry Dynamo, ... progressive... sweetly dissonant... the hippest and most arresting music... Plain ol' fun... a music for the 90s clearly enjoyed by players and audience alike.

- Mark Alburger, 20th-Century Music